E2-Pit


The E2-Pit tracksite was at the southeast end of the Two Camp Anticline which has ten tracksites exposed along a four kilometer stretch of the north facing anticline limb.  The E2-Pit site was characterized by fine-grained, organic shales and mudstones.  There was quite a large number of in situ tree stumps with radiating root systems, some of these root systems were fairly extensive (see figure below).  The vertebrate ichnofauna was composed exclusively of ankylosaur prints and trackways.

E2-Pit tracksite with in situ tree stump.

The metal plate in the top right of the picture is about 20cm across.

(Photograph provided by Dr. Philip J. Currie, courtesy of Alberta Community Development and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology)

Instead of a solitary ankylosaur trackway like at the 9 Mine site, there were several distinct trackways on a large 60 degree footwall surface (see figure below).

Photograph and illustration of the E2-Pit tracksite

(Photograph provided by Dr. Philip J. Currie, courtesy of Alberta Community Development and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology)

It just happened that some photographers on assignment from National Geographic were visiting the area with Phil Currie and wanted to take some pictures of Phil documenting the E2 Pit site while on ropes. The ropes were set and Phil was ready to get on the wall, but the light was getting too poor for photographic purposes so the session was postponed until the morning of July 4th. Arriving at the E2 Pit site the next morning the scientists and photographers found that almost the entire footprint surface had fallen into the pit. This was the backup site for the National Geographic shoot, the primary site at the Narraway River had already collapsed some time before then.